Five hundred and twentythird Asic – The Grapes of Wrath- A Sort of Book Review

What Makes a Good Book Good Enough?

That is one of the things that keeps me busy when I start reading any book whatsoever… Like many other students I was forced to read ”Of Mice and Men” in school as a teenager, and I guess my teacher picked the novel for a few different reasons, among one was the endurable length… I was however thrilled by the way Steinbeck built up his characters and how the story developed.  From a few hints on how George and Lennie had to move on again, after something terrible had happened, I realized I was already thinking; What had happened? As a young reader of a classic novel I was thrilled enough to keep reading until the very last page… I also read ”The Pearl” with great interest and without any effort, but for a novel like ”The Grapes of Wrath” it takes 455 pages before you know the end of the story. As a young reader, I did not meet that challenge, but a summer a couple of years ago, during a vaction in California, ”The Grapes of Wrath” was my perfect companion. I drove past the road sign with ”Salinas” and I went to Monterey and the Monterey Bay Aquarium where a section in the Museum describes John Steinbeck’s writing and I was happy to know that in my car, the book was waiting for me to turn the next page and the next…

Nobelpris_medalj

John Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize in 1962,

”for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”

 Although ”The Grapes of Wrath” was written in 1938 and first published in 1939, the content is extremely important also in 2018. Migrants today, face the same kind of ignorance and racism as the Okies (people from Oklahoma, moving to California) in Steinbeck’s novel. Migrants both now and then, left for the thought of a better future, filled with hope, but also fear. Their plans and hopes are not always fulfilled…

Describing the process of change in a person’s life, like Steinbeck does in ”The Grapes of Wrath”, is a delicate matter between being true or being pathetic. Neither can you exaggerate too much nor be too shallow.

The novel very closely describes the extremely poor conditions for migrant workers in California in the thirties. Racism, cruelty and violence together with greed seems to be the rule and being from Oklahoma, means being an Okie, which is a stigmatised group at the time. No matter how hard they work, they seem to face very little understanding and empathy from the Californians. The Okies move from one workplace to the other and get less paid for each time they move, so it seems.

vindruvor

Throughout the novel, Steinbeck give descriptions of the surrounding landscape and certain topics of interest. One of the chapters is like a dialogue between a car salesman and an Okie buyer and written with humor, although the underlying message is that many poor Okies were fooled by the car dealers, selling off good cattle or mules in trade for a jalopy. Another such chapter is a very nice description of a few instruments, the harmonica, the guitar and the fiddle and how they blend in together for the coming dance evening, when a certain piece of music is played. That is also where ”Swedes up in Dakota” (p 342) are mentioned, which is fun to read for me as Swedish.

But apart from these humorous chapters, there are also some very critical topics, as when Steinbeck describes how land owners had too much fruit and too much potatoes, too many pigs and instead of giving the food to the extremely poor workers, they poisoned the potatoes, drowned the pigs and drenched the fruit in kerosene, only for the pleasure of not giving it to the starving workers. That is when ”The Grapes of Wrath”(p 349) is uttered…

A good book is a book you never forget…

That is what ”The Grapes of Wrath” was to me…

 

cotton-capsule

Annonser

Four Hundred and Eightieth Asic – The Grapes of Wrath- A Sort of Book Review

What Makes a Good Book Good Enough?

That is one of the things that keeps me busy when I start reading any book whatsoever… Like many other students I was forced to read ”Of Mice and Men” in school as a teenager, and I guess my teacher picked the novel for a few different reasons, among one was the endurable length… I was however thrilled by the way Steinbeck built up his characters and how the story developed.  From a few hints on how George and Lennie had to move on again, after something terrible had happened, I realized I was already thinking; What had happened? As a young reader of a classic novel I was thrilled enough to keep reading until the very last page… I also read ”The Pearl” with great interest and without any effort, but for a novel like ”The Grapes of Wrath” it takes 455 pages before you know the end of the story. As a young reader, I did not meet that challenge, but last summer, during a vaction in California, ”The Grapes of Wrath” was my perfect companion. I drove past the road sign with ”Salinas” and I went to Monterey and the Monterey Bay Aquarium where a section in the Museum describes John Steinbeck’s writing and I was happy to know that in my car, the book was waiting for me to turn the next page and the next…

Nobelpris_medalj

John Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize in 1962,

”for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”

To me as a Swedish reader, both when I was young and now, I  must say Steinbeck really made a difference. I can see his deep engagement concerning important issues in society and although ”The Grapes of Wrath” was written in 1938 and first published in 1939, the content is extremely important also in 2016. In Europe where I live, migration is an every day topic, since many thousands of people are on the move between different countries. Some end up in camps or in asylum seeking procedures where bureaucratic systems cannot handle the massiv number of applications quick enough. Migrants today, face the same kind of ignorance and racism as the Okies (people from Oklahoma, moving to California) in Steinbeck’s novel. Migrants both now and then, left for the thought of a better future, filled with hope, but also fear. Their plans may be delayed or sometimes changed, and for a few the plans and hopes may never be fulfilled, due to accidents or other problems along the way.

Describing the process of change in a person’s life, like Steinbeck does in ”The Grapes of Wrath”, is a delicate matter, since it is walking on a thin line between being true or being pathetic. Neither can you exaggerate too much nor be too shallow. When the story begins we meet the American state Oklahoma when the weather conditions have been very poor for a long time. Draught and winds have left the land destroyed and every corn field has a layer of dust that makes the corn worthless. The protagonist Tom Joad, is an ex-convict from Mac Alester, where he sat four years for homicide. Now he is out on parole. Tom Joad comes back home in company with an old friend of the family, Jim Casy. In order to find job and better opportunities the Joads decide to leave Oklahoma for California. During the long trip from Sallisaw, Oklahoma to California both Grandpa and Grandma die. Tom’s brother Noah, and his sister’s boyfriend Connie leave the family for different reasons, but the rest of the family stick together. Ma and Pa, Tom and his brother Al, their sister Rosasharn who is pregnant and the younger children Ruthie and Windfield all come to California after a very tough trip through several states, over mountains and finally through the desert.

The novel very closely describes the extremely poor conditions for migrant workers in California in the thirties. Racism, cruelty and violence together with greed seems to be the rule and being from Oklahoma, means being an Okie, which is a stigmatised group at the time. No matter how hard they work, they seem to face very little understanding and empathy from the Californians. The Joads and the other Okies move from one workplace to the other and get less paid for each time they move, so it seems. For several reasons Tom gets in trouble again.

vindruvor

Throughout the novel, Steinbeck give descriptions of the surrounding landscape and certain topics of interest. One of the chapters is like a dialogue between a car salesman and an Okie buyer and written with humor, although the underlying message is that many poor Okies were fooled by the car dealers, selling off good cattle or mules in trade for a jalopy. Another such chapter is a very nice description of a few instruments, the harmonica, the guitar and the fiddle and how they blend in together for the coming dance evening, when a certain piece of music is played. That is also where ”Swedes up in Dakota” (p 342) are mentioned, which is fun to read for me as Swedish.

But apart from these humorous chapters, there are also some very critical topics, as when Steinbeck describes how land owners had too much fruit and too much potatoes, too many pigs and instead of giving the food to the extremely poor workers, they poisoned the potatoes, drowned the pigs and drenched the fruit in kerosene, only for the pleasure of not giving it to the starving workers. That is when ”The Grapes of Wrath”(p 349) is uttered…

For a period of time, the Joads live in the Weedpatch camp, which is a state camp. For the first time in their lives, Ruthie and Windfield see toilets. The workers are all involved in taking care of the camp together, making sure it is kept clean. Here the Joads meet other people they can trust and make friends with and for a moment the reader is fooled to think this book has a happy ending…

I highly recommend ”The Grapes of Wrath” if you would like to get a glimpse of migrant life from the inside. The novel reveal several complex issues and through the Joads and their discussions throughout the novel, you and I get a chance to consider those issues, too. With the coming election in the USA last year when I was there, the voters could decide whether there would be harder times or not for migrant workers from abroad, picking fruit and cotton in California for the benefit of American producers. Some of the migrants came there just like the Joads, with the hope of a better future. Some of the current Californians are likely to be decendants from Okies who came in the thirties.

Let us read books like ”The Grapes of Wrath” and never forget what made us the ones we are today.

cotton-capsule

Three Hundred and Seventy-Ninth Asic – Nobel Prize in literature 2016, Part 1

What Makes a Good Book Good Enough?

That is one of the things that keeps me busy when I start reading any book whatsoever… Like many other students I was forced to read several books by Nobel Prize winners in school as a teenager, and I guess my teachers picked the novels for different reasons… One of the authors I started to like by reading in school was John Steinbeck. I was thrilled by the way Steinbeck built up his characters in ”Of Mice and Men” and how the story developed.  From a few hints on how George and Lennie had to move on again, after something terrible had happened, I realized I was already thinking; What had happened? As a young reader of a classic novel I was thrilled enough to keep reading until the very last page… I also read ”The Pearl” with great interest and without any effort, but for a novel like ”The Grapes of Wrath” it takes 455 pages before you know the end of the story. As a young reader, I did not meet that challenge, but this summer, during a vaction in California, ”The Grapes of Wrath” was my perfect companion. I drove past the road sign with ”Salinas” and I went to Monterey and the Monterey Bay Aquarium where a section in the Museum describes John Steinbeck’s writing and I was happy to know that in my car, the book was waiting for me to turn the next page and the next…

Nobelpris_medalj

John Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize in 1962,

”for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”

To me as a Swedish reader, both when I was young and now, I  must say Steinbeck really made a difference. I can see his deep engagement concerning important issues in society and although ”The Grapes of Wrath” was written in 1938 and first published in 1939, the content is extremely important also in 2016. In Europe where I live, migration is an every day topic, since many thousands of people are on the move between different countries. Some end up in camps or in asylum seeking procedures where bureaucratic systems cannot handle the massive number of applications quickly enough. Migrants today, face the same kind of ignorance and racism as the Okies (people from Oklahoma, moving to California) in Steinbeck’s novel. Migrants both now and then, left for the thought of a better future, filled with hope, but also fear. Their plans may be delayed or sometimes changed, and for a few the plans and hopes may never be fulfilled, due to accidents or other problems along the way.

Describing the process of change in a person’s life, like Steinbeck does in ”The Grapes of Wrath”, is a delicate matter, since it is walking on a thin line between being true or being pathetic. Neither can you exaggerate too much nor be too shallow. When the story begins we meet the American state Oklahoma when the weather conditions have been very poor for a long time. Draught and winds have left the land destroyed and every corn field has a layer of dust that makes the corn worthless. The protagonist Tom Joad, is an ex-convict from Mac Alester, where he sat four years for homicide. Now he is out on parole. Tom Joad comes back home in company with an old friend of the family, Jim Casy. In order to find job and better opportunities the Joads decide to leave Oklahoma for California. During the long trip from Sallisaw, Oklahoma to California both Grandpa and Grandma die. Tom’s brother Noah, and his sister’s boyfriend Connie leave the family for different reasons, but the rest of the family stick together. Ma and Pa, Tom and his brother Al, their sister Rosasharn who is pregnant and the younger children Ruthie and Windfield all come to California after a very tough trip through several states, over mountains and finally through the desert.

The novel very closely describes the extremely poor conditions for migrant workers in California in the thirties. Racism, cruelty and violence together with greed seems to be the rule and being from Oklahoma, means being an Okie, which is a stigmatised group at the time. No matter how hard they work, they seem to face very little understanding and empathy from the Californians. The Joads and the other Okies move from one workplace to the other and get less paid for each time they move, so it seems. For several reasons Tom gets in trouble again.

vindruvor

Throughout the novel, Steinbeck give descriptions of the surrounding landscape and certain topics of interest. One of the chapters is like a dialogue between a car salesman and an Okie buyer and written with humor, although the underlying message is that many poor Okies were fooled by the car dealers, selling off good cattle or mules in trade for a jalopy. Another such chapter is a very nice description of a few instruments, the harmonica, the guitar and the fiddle and how they blend in together for the coming dance evening, when a certain piece of music is played. That is also where ”Swedes up in Dakota” (p 342) are mentioned, which is fun to read for me as Swedish.

But apart from these humorous chapters, there are also some very critical topics, as when Steinbeck describes how land owners had too much fruit and too much potatoes, too many pigs and instead of giving the food to the extremely poor workers, they poisoned the potatoes, drowned the pigs and drenched the fruit in kerosene, only for the pleasure of not giving it to the starving workers. That is when ”The Grapes of Wrath”(p 349) is uttered…

For a period of time, the Joads live in the Weedpatch camp, which is a state camp. For the first time in their lives, Ruthie and Windfield see toilets. The workers are all involved in taking care of the camp together, making sure it is kept clean. Here the Joads meet other people they can trust and make friends with and for a moment the reader is fooled to think this book has a happy ending…

I highly recommend ”The Grapes of Wrath” if you would like to get a glimpse of migrant life from the inside. The novel reveal several complex issues and through the Joads and their discussions throughout the novel, you and I get a chance to consider those issues, too. With the coming election in the USA, the voters can decide whether there will be harder times or not for migrant workers from abroad, picking fruit and cotton in California for the benefit of American producers. Some of the migrants came there just like the Joads, with the hope of a better future. Some of the current Californians are likely to be decendants from Okies who came in the thirties.

Let us read books like ”The Grapes of Wrath” and never forget what made us the ones we are today.

cotton-capsule

Three Hundred and Thirty-First Asic – The Grapes of Wrath- A Sort of Book Review

What Makes a Good Book Good Enough?

That is one of the things that keeps me busy when I start reading any book whatsoever… Like many other students I was forced to read ”Of Mice and Men” in school as a teenager, and I guess my teacher picked the novel for a few different reasons, among one was the endurable length… I was however thrilled by the way Steinbeck built up his characters and how the story developed.  From a few hints on how George and Lennie had to move on again, after something terrible had happened, I realized I was already thinking; What had happened? As a young reader of a classic novel I was thrilled enough to keep reading until the very last page… I also read ”The Pearl” with great interest and without any effort, but for a novel like ”The Grapes of Wrath” it takes 455 pages before you know the end of the story. As a young reader, I did not meet that challenge, but this summer, during a vaction in California, ”The Grapes of Wrath” was my perfect companion. I drove past the road sign with ”Salinas” and I went to Monterey and the Monterey Bay Aquarium where a section in the Museum describes John Steinbeck’s writing and I was happy to know that in my car, the book was waiting for me to turn the next page and the next…

Nobelpris_medalj

John Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize in 1962,

”for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”

To me as a Swedish reader, both when I was young and now, I  must say Steinbeck really made a difference. I can see his deep engagement concerning important issues in society and although ”The Grapes of Wrath” was written in 1938 and first published in 1939, the content is extremely important also in 2016. In Europe where I live, migration is an every day topic, since many thousands of people are on the move between different countries. Some end up in camps or in asylum seeking procedures where bureaucratic systems cannot handle the massiv number of applications quick enough. Migrants today, face the same kind of ignorance and racism as the Okies (people from Oklahoma, moving to California) in Steinbeck’s novel. Migrants both now and then, left for the thought of a better future, filled with hope, but also fear. Their plans may be delayed or sometimes changed, and for a few the plans and hopes may never be fulfilled, due to accidents or other problems along the way.

Describing the process of change in a person’s life, like Steinbeck does in ”The Grapes of Wrath”, is a delicate matter, since it is walking on a thin line between being true or being pathetic. Neither can you exaggerate too much nor be too shallow. When the story begins we meet the American state Oklahoma when the weather conditions have been very poor for a long time. Draught and winds have left the land destroyed and every corn field has a layer of dust that makes the corn worthless. The protagonist Tom Joad, is an ex-convict from Mac Alester, where he sat four years for homicide. Now he is out on parole. Tom Joad comes back home in company with an old friend of the family, Jim Casy. In order to find job and better opportunities the Joads decide to leave Oklahoma for California. During the long trip from Sallisaw, Oklahoma to California both Grandpa and Grandma die. Tom’s brother Noah, and his sister’s boyfriend Connie leave the family for different reasons, but the rest of the family stick together. Ma and Pa, Tom and his brother Al, their sister Rosasharn who is pregnant and the younger children Ruthie and Windfield all come to California after a very tough trip through several states, over mountains and finally through the desert.

The novel very closely describes the extremely poor conditions for migrant workers in California in the thirties. Racism, cruelty and violence together with greed seems to be the rule and being from Oklahoma, means being an Okie, which is a stigmatised group at the time. No matter how hard they work, they seem to face very little understanding and empathy from the Californians. The Joads and the other Okies move from one workplace to the other and get less paid for each time they move, so it seems. For several reasons Tom gets in trouble again.

vindruvor

Throughout the novel, Steinbeck give descriptions of the surrounding landscape and certain topics of interest. One of the chapters is like a dialogue between a car salesman and an Okie buyer and written with humor, although the underlying message is that many poor Okies were fooled by the car dealers, selling off good cattle or mules in trade for a jalopy. Another such chapter is a very nice description of a few instruments, the harmonica, the guitar and the fiddle and how they blend in together for the coming dance evening, when a certain piece of music is played. That is also where ”Swedes up in Dakota” (p 342) are mentioned, which is fun to read for me as Swedish.

But apart from these humorous chapters, there are also some very critical topics, as when Steinbeck describes how land owners had too much fruit and too much potatoes, too many pigs and instead of giving the food to the extremely poor workers, they poisoned the potatoes, drowned the pigs and drenched the fruit in kerosene, only for the pleasure of not giving it to the starving workers. That is when ”The Grapes of Wrath”(p 349) is uttered…

For a period of time, the Joads live in the Weedpatch camp, which is a state camp. For the first time in their lives, Ruthie and Windfield see toilets. The workers are all involved in taking care of the camp together, making sure it is kept clean. Here the Joads meet other people they can trust and make friends with and for a moment the reader is fooled to think this book has a happy ending…

I highly recommend ”The Grapes of Wrath” if you would like to get a glimpse of migrant life from the inside. The novel reveal several complex issues and through the Joads and their discussions throughout the novel, you and I get a chance to consider those issues, too. With the coming election in the USA, the voters can decide whether there will be harder times or not for migrant workers from abroad, picking fruit and cotton in California for the benefit of American producers. Some of the migrants came there just like the Joads, with the hope of a better future. Some of the current Californians are likely to be decendants from Okies who came in the thirties.

Let us read books like ”The Grapes of Wrath” and never forget what made us the ones we are today.

cotton-capsule

Tvåhundrafemtiofjärde åseriet- Imre Kertész, en författare som gjort skillnad!

Mannen utan öde_

Imre Kertész har i likhet med andra överlevande av Förintelsen under andra världskriget delat sin historia, antingen i fiktiv form eller genom otaliga föreläsningar och besök i skolor. Deras generation har snart gått ur tiden. Igår gick just Imre Kertész ur tiden. Jag skriver mitt blogginlägg för att vi inte ska glömma honom och hans författarskap. Hans texter har bidragit till vår kunskap om en tid som inte längre är. År 2002 tilldelades Imre Kertész Nobelpriset i litteratur med motiveringen:

”ett författarskap som hävdar den enskildes bräckliga erfarenhet mot historiens barbariska godtycke”

Läs den där motiveringen igen!

Den är kärnan i den enda bok av Imre Kertész som just jag har läst, nämligen Mannen utan öde. Jag läste den inte när Kertész just hade fått Nobelpriset, utan några år därefter, i samband med att jag lånade hem en bok som låg i bokförrådet på den gymnasieskola där jag då arbetade. Av baksidestexten framgick att boken hade delats ut som en gåva till alla gymnasielever i årskurs 3 år 2002. Den typen av information intresserar mig. Varför ska en hel årskull läsa en viss bok? Jag ville helt enkelt veta vad som var så speciellt med just denna skildring. Fakta och fiktion i kombination kompletterar varandra alldeles utmärkt för ökad förståelse, som jag ser det. Därför är en sådan sak som att dela ut en bok till gymnasieelever en god idé om man samtidigt tar sig tid att diskutera och förklara och skapa en bakgrundsbild till ett sådant viktigt område som Förintelsen. Jag har läst många olika skildringar av varierande kvalitet om just Förintelsen och även om andra världskriget i allmänhet. Därför tänkte jag om Imre Kertész bok när jag stod i materialrummet och höll den i handen,  att den var ”en i mängden”. I efterhand är det emellertid så att just den skildringen tydligt skiljer sig från mängden på en viktig punkt, nämligen just det som står i motiveringen till Nobelpriset här ovanför.

”Mannen utan öde” är skriven som om den är självbiografisk, men enligt uppgift i olika artiklar, bland annat av Göran Sommardal (Aftonbladet 160331), är det inte en självbiografi, utan en fiktiv berättelse som i hög grad liknar Kertész eget öde. Boken handlar om en fjortonårig pojke i Budapest, som år 1944 inte får åka med bussen, utan måste gå av, utan vidare förklaring. Redan där har vi egentligen ett exempel på ”historiens barbariska godtycke” som Nobelprismotiveringen antyder… Pojken förstår först inte alls, men sedan inser han åtminstone när bussen försvunnit i fjärran att han inte är ensam om sitt öde. I likhet med andra judar har han tvingats avbryta sin resa och ut från buss efter buss, kommer många andra som likt honom inte heller förstår allvaret. Från den stunden är allt i stort sett obegripligt för pojken, men jag som läser texten kan känna igen det pojken upplever från otaliga faktaskildringar jag läst i olika källor. Den stora skillnaden mellan att läsa torra fakta, jämfört med att läsa fiktion i form av en nära-nog-självupplevd skildring av samma tidsperiod,  är att fiktionen ger en annan bild, betydligt rikare och mer mångfacetterad än de kortfattade komplexa meningar som man återfinner i en historiebok om andra världskriget. Att förstå en tidsperiod från olika perspektiv, med hjälp av de många olika röster som var med på den tiden, möjliggör för mig att identifiera mig med dem som levde då, som var med och såg med sina egna ögon.

Trots att Mannen utan öde likt alla de alla skildringarna utlovar ett inifrånperspektiv från förintelselägren under andra världskriget, så är det inte det som i första hand gör boken läsvärd. I mitt tycke är det snarare den litterära gestaltning som författaren ger den fjortonårige huvudpersonen. Han är verkligen helt ovetande om vad som väntar honom och hans gradvisa uppvaknande är vad som gör boken så speciell. Skildringen innehåller väldigt många motbjudande detaljer och fasansfulla upplevelser, men väldigt lite av pekpinnar och snusförnuftiga kommentarer. Den är inte heller sentimental, utan rak i kommunikationen. Den skildrar hela tiden pojken och hans perspektiv på ett sätt som skapar en insikt på djupet hos läsaren. Därför förstår jag varför man skulle vilja dela ut just den till årskurs tre i gymnasieskolan. Man vill att också de ska drabbas av samma genomgripande insikt.

Björn Granaths inläsning av ”Mannen utan öde” av Imre Kertész

 

Etthundraåttionde åseriet- Välkommen till Sverige den 10 december, Svetlana Aleksijevitj!

Svetlana Aleksijevitj var en av favoriterna inför årets Nobelpris i litteratur. Jag såg flera olika soffprogram innan vi fick veta vem som egentligen skulle få motta detta ärofyllda pris. I varje program föreslog olika förståsigpåare att just Aleksijevitj skulle få priset. Det har alltid fascinerat mig hur det ett och samma år kan vara så många som plötsligt gemensamt har en viss kandidat som de framhåller som den självklara i mängden, som om det inte fanns andra som vore värdiga mottagare… Vid ett enda tillfälle har jag kunnat säga ”Åååååååååååååå! tillsammans med alla som gör precis detta i samband med att Svenska Akademiens ständiga sekreterare yttrar den korta motiveringen till priset ett visst år. Den gången det inträffade var då Doris Lessing fick priset. Jag hade läst Lessing och uppskattat hennes sätt att skriva…

Men i år, 2015, så var jag i samma situation som så många gånger förr när soffprogrammens gäster började nämna Aleksijevitj. Jag tänkte att jag inte ville vara fullt så okunnig denna gång. Jag ville undvika att drabbas av den pinsamma tanken ”Vem är det?!” i stället för att igenkännande säga: ”Åååååååååå!!” Sagt och gjort… Jag började googla på just Aleksijevitj och hittade en del titlar som getts ut på svenska. Jag började läsa OM dessa titlar och fastnade speciellt för den metod hon sades använda, nämligen omfattande intervjuer med personer som deltagit i ett visst historiskt skeende som hon intresserat sig för. Jag läste om hur boken ”Bön för Tjernobyl”(2011) tillkommit och började förstå att även om hon inte skulle få Nobelpriset, så skulle jag ändå vilja läsa hennes böcker. Då dagen för publiceringen av namnet äntligen kom och det faktiskt blev just denna dam från Belarus som erhöll priset gjorde jag OMEDELBART, samma minut, en beställning av boken ”Bön för Tjernobyl” och bokade dessutom i Storytel den ljudbok med titeln ”Kriget har inget kvinnligt ansikte” (2012).

Denna helg har jag levt med ljudbokens kvinnoöden medan jag julstädat. NU förstår jag varför alla soffprogrammens gäster pratade sig varma för denna författare. Med endast en bok i ryggen för egen del, kan jag utan tvekan säga att det är en värdig mottagare av detta exklusiva litterära pris. Att lägga ner så mycket tid, kraft, fokus och intresse på en sådan sak som att dokumentera kvinnoöden kopplade till andra världskriget är redan DET ett livsverk, men eftersom Aleksijevitj har gjort om denna bedrift igen och igen och igen, så kan jag inte annat än att beundra henne för den målmedvetenhet hon visat sig själv och oss. Att så gripande återge den emotionella kärnan av kvinnornas minnen, visar även det hur stor författarinnans gåva är. All beundran. Verkligen. Jag ska läsa allt jag kommer över, bok efter bok. Jag har funnit en ny favoritförfattare.

Etthundrasextionionde åseriet- Det vete katten vem det blir!

Jag såg just på Aktuellt att #Eva Beckmans katt tvärsäkert sprang fram och slukade räkorna framför Svetlana Aleksievitjs foto…

Nog hade det väl varit dags att påverka utvecklingen genom att lägga ett tydligt spår av räkor fram till den tallrik där Joyce Carol Oates foto fanns? 😉

Räkor

Nobelpriset i litteratur borde gå till Joyce Carol Oates! Om jag hade motiverat, så hade det blivit så här:

”För engagerande, djuplodande och mångfacetterade skildringar av den amerikanska samtiden” 

Joyce Carol Oates headshot